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Full text of "P & S ... : the yearbook of the College of Physicians and Surgeons, Columbia University in the city of New York"

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Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2012 with funding from 

Metropolitan New York Library Council - METRO 



http://www.archive.org/details/psyearbookofcoll1947colu 



.o our knowledge this is the first year- 
book to be published by a graduating class 
of the College of Physicians and Surgeons 
in all the years of its existence. 

Parturition in our primiparous state was 
not without difficulty, and, indeed, we felt 
the pains of first labor severely. Now, like 
the mother who sees her child for the first 
time, we are both amazed and proud. 



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1>&S*47 



THE YEARBOOK OF 



The College of Physicians and Surgeons 



Columbia University 



in the City of \ew York 



630 West 168th Street, 



iVpw York 9 N. Y. 



Copyright 1947 by "P & S '47," 630 West 168th St., N. Y. C. 





Frank Dichl Favkenthal, LL. D., Litt.D. 



Acting President 
Columbia 1/nlversllT 



HH 



Willard Cole Rapplvye, 
A.M., 31. D., Se.D. 

Dean 
College of Physicians and Surgeons 



t* 



Aura Edward Svrvrinyhtius, 
B. S.. A. M., Ph. D. 

Associate Dean and Secretary 



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WILLIAM GEORGE ABEL, III 

Columbia 

Bellevue Hospital, New York, N. Y. 



PERRY GWYNNE MORE AUSTIN, JR. 

5913 Corso di Napoli, Long Beach, Calif. 

Princeton 

Los Angeles General Hospital, 

Los Angeles, Calif. 





WILLIAM ALLEN BAUMAN 

17 Linwood Rd., New Rochelle, N. Y. 

Harvard 

Kings County Hospital, New York, N. Y. 



PETER BECK 

Alburg, Vt. 
Dartmouth 
Mary Fletcher Hospital, Burlington, Vt. 




CHARLES R. BENTON 

1436 ^". University Ave., Gainesville, Fla. 

Florida 

Mary Imogene Bassett Hospital, 

Cooperstown, N. Y. 





STANLEY BURTON BRAHAM 

144 Van Guilder Ave., New Rochelle, N. Y. 

Columbia 

Mount Sinai Hospital, New York, N. Y. 



EDGAR W. BRANYON, JR. 

Hamilton, Ala. 

Alabama 

Louisville General Hospital, Louisville, Ky. 





EDWARD S. BUCKLEY, JR. 

Louella and Pembroke, ^ ayne, Pa. 

Yale 

Peter Bent Brigbam Hospital, Boston, Mass. 




RUPERT C. BURTAN 

3003 Grand Concourse, New York, N. Y. 

Massachusetts Institute of Technology & 

Columbia 

Lenox Hill Hospital, New York, N. Y. 



ALEXANDER CAEMMERER, JR. 

165 Fairview Ave., Westwood, N. J. 

Princeton 

Methodist Hospital, New York, N. Y. 





ENOCH CALLAWAY, III 

310 Broad St., LaGrange, Ga. 

Columbia 

Grady Hospital, Atlanta, Ga. 



NICHOLAS ERNEST CAPECI 

248 N. Regent St., Port Chester, N. Y. 
Harvard 







10 



ORSON P. CARDON 

932 N. Euclid, Tucson, Ariz. 

Arizona 

Long Island College Hospital, New York, N. Y. 





HUGH CHAPLIN, JR. 

16 E. 96th St., New York, N. Y. 

Princeton 

Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Mass. 



GRANGE SIMONS COFFIN 

2 Fountain Square, Larchmont, N. Y. 

Yale 

Roosevelt Hospital, New York, N. Y. 





JEAN LAWRENCE COOK, JR. 

824 E. 165th St., New York, N. Y. 

Columbia 

Presbyterian Hospital, New York, N. Y. 




WILLIAM HOWARD COX, JR. 

11 Ann wood Lane, Cincinnati, O. 

Yale 

Cincinnati General Hospital, Cincinnati, O. 



MORTON CHARLES CREDITOR 

874 Bedford Avenue, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Purdue 

Bellevue Hospital, New York, N. Y. 





GEORGE CYTROEN 

1255 Stratford Avenue, New York, N. Y. 

Columbia 

Boston City Hospital, Boston, Mass. 



GABRIEL ALEXIS D'AMATO 

600 W. 161st St., New York, N. Y. 

Seton Hall 

Orange Memorial Hospital, Orange, N. J. 




12 



WALTER L. DAVIS 

6726 Ditman St., Philadelphia, Pa. 

Hamilton 

Bellevue Hospital, New York, N. Y. 





WALKER DEMPSEY 

Red Bay, Ala. 
Alabama 

Rhode Island Hospital, Providence, R. I. 



JOE WILLIAM DENSON 

Boaz, Ala. 

Alabama 

Charity Hospital, New Orleans, La. 





STEPHEN HENRI DESCHAMPS 

4 W. 31st St., New York, N. Y. 

Columbia 

New Haven Hospital, New Haven, Conn. 



13 










JOSEPH MICHAEL DI CAPRIO 

420 Knickerbocker Ave., Paterson, N. J. 

Columbia 

Long Island College Hospital, New York, N. Y. 



WILLIAM C. L. DIEFENBACH III 

25-40 30th Rd., Long Island City, N. Y. 

Columbia 

Albany City Hospital, Albany, N. Y. 





ROBERT M. DONAUER 

34 Bedford Rd., Summit, N. J. 

Princeton 

Lenox Hill Hospital, New York, N. Y. 



FRANK C. DRESDALE 

248 Broadway, East Paterson, N. J. 

Brown 

Bellevue Hospital, New York, N. Y. 




14 



PHILIP E. DUFFY 

600 W. 115th St., New York, N. Y. 

Columbia 

Kings County Hospital, New York, N. Y. 





ARTHUR WILLIAM EPSTEIN 

300 W. 108th St., New York, N. Y. 

Columbia 

Mount Sinai Hospital, New York, N. Y. 



ARTHUR EDWARD FALK 

910 Riverside Drive, New York, N. Y. 

Columbia 

Mount Sinai Hospital, New York, N. Y. 





ANTHONY B. FELICE 

643 W. 172nd St., New York, N. Y. 

Fordham 

Fordham Hospital, New York, N. Y. 



15 




E. MAURICE FLINT 

52 Avondale Park, Rochester, N. Y. 

Oberlin 

Methodist Hospital, New York, N. Y. 



WILMOT D. FOSTER 

2626 N. E. 23rd Ave., Portland, Ore. 

Oregon 

St. Vincent's Hospital, Portland, Ore. 





J. GEORGE FUREY 

31 Harvard Terrace, West Orange, N. J. 

Colgate 

Methodist Hospital, New York, N. Y. 



ROBERT AYRES FURMAN 

31 Roseville Ave., Newark, N. J. 

Princeton 

Lakeside Hospital, Cleveland, 0. 




16 



EDWARD B. GARDNER 

88 Haven Ave., New York, N. Y. 

Harvard 

Beth Israel Hospital, New York, N. Y. 





GILBERT LEE GORDON 

New York, N. Y. 

Yale 

New Haven Hospital, New York, N. Y. 



STUART GRAVES, JR. 

90 Highlands, Tuscaloosa, Ala. 

Alabama 

St. Luke's Hospital, New York, N. Y. 





CHRISTOPHER A. GUARINO, JR. 

2925 Oneil Place, New York, N. Y. 

Columbia 

Fordham Hospital, New York, N. Y. 



17 




THOMAS CLAIBORNE GUTHRIE III 

550 Parker St., Newark, N. J. 

Princeton 

Bellevue Hospital, New York, N. Y. 



ROBERT S. HAGSTROM 

132 Clarencedale Ave., Youngstown, O. 
Ohio State 

Mary Imogene Bassett Hospital, 
Cooperstown, N. Y. 





ROBERT ELLIOTT HALL 

5619 Fair Oaks St., Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Harvard 

St. Luke's Hospital, New York, N. Y. 



& 



GEORGE NICHOLLS HAZLEHURST 

Clover Hill, Spotswood, N. J. 

Princeton 

Roosevelt Hospital, New York, N. Y. 




18 



FREDERICK W. HEHRE 

17 Elizabeth Ave., Arlington, N. J. 

Columbia 

St. Clare's Hospital, New York, N. Y. 





ROBERT E. HINDMAN 

Salix, la. 

Iowa State 

Bellevue Hospital, New York, N. Y. 



JAMES FREDERICK HOLLAND 

Normandy Parkway, Morristown, N. J. 

Princeton 

Presbyterian Hospital, New York, N. Y. 






> 




i |v' x 




CHARLES PETER HYSLOP 

34-47 80th St., Jackson Hights, N. Y. 

Yale 

Brooklyn Hospital, New York, N. Y. 



19 




GARRY CURTISS JACOBUS 

856 Wolfram Street, Chicago, 111. 

Dartmouth 

Presbyterian Hospital, Chicago, 111. 



PIERRE JOHANNET 

155 E. 73rd St., New York, N. Y. 

Columbia 

Orange Memorial Hospital, Orange, N. J. 





ROBERT B. JOHNSON 

1047 E. Lester, Tuc6on, Ariz. 

Arizona 

Baylor University Hospital, Dallas, Tex. 



AUSTIN DAVID JOHNSTON 

6 Lady Musgrove Rd., Half-Way-Tree, 

Jamaica, B. W. I. 

Columbia 

Hospital for Joint Diseases, 

New York, N. Y. 




20 



OLE THOR JONASSEN 

34 Horatio St., New York, N. Y. 

Columbia 

Kings County Hospital, New York, N. Y. 





HARRIS ELLIOTT KAROWE 

585 W. 214th St., New York, N. Y. 

Long Island 

Mount Sinai Hospital, New York, N. Y. 



GLORIA KARSHAN 

420 Riverside Drive, New York, N. Y. 

Vassar 

Beth Israel Hospital, New York, N. Y. 





JOHN PIERSON KENGETER 

196 21st St., Irvington, N. J. 

Wheaton 

St. Barnabas Hospital, Newark', N. J. 



21 




STEWART A. KING 

2173 Park Ave., Bridgeport, Conn. 

Harvard 

Boston City Hospital, Boston, Mass. 



KENNETH D. KITTLESON 

535 Wall St., N. Mankato, Minn. 

Wesleyan 

White Plains General Hospital, 

White Plains, N. Y. 





WARREN HARDING KNAUER 

930 Elizabeth Ave., Elizabeth, N. J. 

Princeton 

St. Vincent's Hospital, New York, N. Y. 



ALFRED GEORGE KNUDSON, JR. 

210 Western Ave., Glendale, Calif. 
California Institute of Technology 
Huntington Memorial Hospital, 
Pasadena, Calif. 




22 



LOUIS LASAGNA 

255 W. 23rd St., New York, N. Y. 

Rutgers 

Mount Sinai Hospital, New York, N. Y. 





VANCE LAUDERDALE, JR. 

Forest Drive, Short Hills, N. J. 

Harvard 

Kings County Hospital, New York, N. Y. 



RICHARD E. LEE 

96 Morgan St., New Bedford, Mass. 

Harvard 

New York Hospital, New York, N. Y. 





DAVID H. LEWIS 

City Home, Welfare Island, New York, N. Y. 

Columbia 

Bellevue Hospital, New York, N. Y. 



23 




KENNETH M. LEWIS, JR. 

1160 Fifth Avenue, New York, N. Y. 

Yale 

Roosevelt Hospital, New York, N. Y. 



F. WILSON LITTLE 

365 E. 193rd St., New York, N. Y. 

Columbia 

Roosevelt Hospital, New York, N. Y. 





EDWIN TUTT LONG 

Skyhigh, West Redding, Conn. 

Columbia 

Methodist Hospital, New York, N. Y. 



DANIEL STANLEY LUKAS 

70 Rutgers Ave., Jersey City, N. J. 

Columbia 

New York Hospital, New York, N. Y. 




24 



ROBERT RIDER LUTTRELL 

33 Summit Dr., Hastings-on-Hudson, N. Y. 
^ illiams 

Mary Hitchcock Memorial Hospital, 
Hanover, N. H. 





ROBERT GREGORY McGOVERN 

139 Baiseley Ave., East Rockaway, N. Y. 
New York 

Philadelphia General Hospital, 
Philadelphia, Pa. 



edward McDonnell mangan 

4 Dartmouth St., Forest Hills, N. Y. 

Columbia 

St. Vincent's Hospital, New York, N. Y. 





LESTER JOEL MARTENS 

98 Liberty PI., Weehawken, N. J. 

Columbia 

Bellevue Hospital, New York, N. Y. 



25 




MARGARET ESTHER MILLER 

4930 Goodridge Ave., New York, N. Y. 

Vassar 

St. Elizabeth's Hospital, Washington, D. C. 



MALCOLM MOLEY 

Santa Barbara, Calif. 

Harvard 

Hospital of The Good Samaritan, 

Los Angeles, Calif. 





JAMES CLINTON MONTEITH 

75 N. Broadway, Nyack, N. Y. 

Yale 

St. Luke's Hospital, New York, N. Y. 



DRYDEN PHELPS MORSE 

40 Battle Rd., Princeton, N. J. 

Harvard 

Philadelphia General Hospital, 

Philadelphia, Pa. 




26 



HIROMICHI TSUDA NARAHARA 

174 N; 1} .'le Ave., New York, N. Y. 

Columbia 

Bellevue Hospital, New York, N. Y. 





WILLIAM C. OFFENKRANTZ 

72 Hansbury Ave., Newark, N. J. 

Rutgers 

Jersey City Medical Center, 

Jersey City, N. J. 



MAURICE M. OSBORNE, JR. 

367 Beacon St., Boston, Mass. 

Harvard 

Bellevue Hospital, New York, N. Y. 





ELLIOTT F. OSSERMAN 

975 Park Ave., New York, N. Y. 

Columbia 

Presbyterian Hospital, New York, N. Y. 



27 




EDWARD FINCH PARSONS 

Percy St., Flushing, N. Y. 

Yale 

Bryn Mawr Hospital, Bryn Mawr, Pa. 



JOHN SANFORD PECK, JR. 

12 Nickel Rd., Scarsdale, N. Y. 
Columbia 

Methodist Hospital, New York, N. Y. 





PEARL STEWART PITT 

Wilmington, Mass. 
Tufts 



HELEN MARGARET RANNEY 

RFD 1, Locke, N. Y. 

Barnard 

Presbyterian Hospital, New York, N. Y. 







28 



JAMES ARTHUR REILLY 

47 Franklin Ct., Garden City, N. Y. 

Princeton 

Bellevue Hospital, New York, N. Y. 





MATTHEW ROSENSCHEIN, JR. 

211 Fort Washington Ave., New York, N. Y. 

Columbia 

Grasslands Hospital, Valhalla, N. Y. 



ISAIAH AARON RUBIN 

124 W. 87th St., New York, N. Y. 

Columbia 

Hospital for Joint Diseases, 

New York, N. Y. 





FREDERICK RUECKERT 

115 W. 11th St., New York, N. Y. 

Hamilton 

Bellevue Hospital, New York, N. Y. 



29 




FRANCIS ROBERT RUSSO 

1758 Popham Ave., New York, N. Y. 

Columbia 

Roosevelt Hospital, New York, N. Y. 



SYLVESTER J. RYAN 

3337 Sedgwick Ave., New York, N. Y. 

Yale 

New Haven Hospital, New Haven, Conn. 





THOMAS CLARK SCANLAN 

473 14th St., Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Yale 

Roosevelt Hospital, New York, N. Y. 



JOHN T. SHARP 

704 4th St., Canyon, Tex. 

Antioch 

Presbyterian Hospital, New York, N. Y. 




30 



ALBERT C. SHERWIN 

215 W. 88th St., New York, N. Y. 

Columbia 

Hospital for Joint Diseases, 

New York, N, Y. 





JAMES B. SIDBURY, JR. 

15 N. Fifth St., Wilmington, N. C. 

Yale 

Roosevelt Hospital, New York, N. Y. 



ALEXANDER CHARLES SMITH 

978 Plandome Rd., Manhasset, N. Y. 

Holy Cross 

Bellevue Hospital, New York, N. Y. 





LEONARD S. SOMMER 

11 Taft St., Springfield, Mass. 

Yale 

Peter Bent Brigham Hospital, 

Boston, Mass. 




ANNA L. S. SOUTHAM 

626 W. 165th St., New York, N. Y. 

Idaho 

Bellevue Hospital, New York, N. Y. 



CHESTER M. SOUTHAM 

626 W. 165th St., New York, N. Y. 

Idaho 

Presbyterian Hospital, New York, N. Y. 





RICHARD JOHN STOCK 

110 Wrexham Rd., Bronxville, N. Y. 

Yale 

Presbyterian Hospital, New York, N. Y. 



ROBERT STRAGNELL 

426 Toyopa Dr., Pacific Palisades, Calif. 

Virginia 

Huntington Memorial Hospital, 

Pasadena, Calif. 




32 



THOMAS T. TAMLYN 

221-28 Edmore Ave., 

Queens Village, N. Y. 

Columbia 

Philadelphia General Hospital, 

Philadelphia, Pa. 





CHARLES BUNNELL TERHUNE 

44 Myrtle Ave., Plainfield, N. J. 

Princeton 

Kings County Hospital, New York, N. Y. 



JAMES RUFUS TRIMBLE 

115 Cooper Ave., Montclair, N. J. 

Princeton 

St. Vincent's Hospital, Portland, Ore. 





ROGER H. UNGER 

15 Heathcote Rd., Scarsdale, N. Y. 

Yale 

Bellevue Hospital, New York, N. Y. 



33 




JOHN M. VANBUREN 

30 Maltbie Ave., Ridgewood, N. J. 

Dartmouth 

Mary Hitchcock Memorial Hospital, 

Hanover, N. H. 



EDWARD FRANCIS VASTOLA 

120 Cables Ave., Waterbury, Conn. 

Yale 

Montefiore Hospital, New York, N. Y. 





WILLIAM EDWARD WILLIAMS 

Farmington, Conn. 

Yale 

Hartford Hospital, Hartford, Conn. 



JOHN COLVER WILSEY 

138 Heller Pkwy., Newark, N. J. 

Princeton 

Bellevue Hospital, New York, N. Y. 






34 



HOWARD LEROY WILSON 

Box 131, Atglen, Pa. 

Columbia 

Lancaster General Hospital, 

Lancaster, Pa. 





CHARLES M. YERGAN 

22 Hamilton Terrace, New York, N. Y. 

Columbia 

Harlem Hospital, New York, N. Y. 



THOMAS S. ROCK 

24 University St., Leominster, Mass. 

Columbia 

Mary Hitchcock Memorial Hospital, 

Hanover, N. H. 



LAWRENCE LEONARD WEED 

32 Mills Ave., Middletown, N. Y. 

Hamilton 

Lakeside Hospital, Cleveland, O. 



HENRY J. WHEELWRIGHT, JR. 

R.F.D. 7, Bangor, Me. 

Yale 

Roosevelt Hospital, New York, N. Y. 



35 




Standing: Braham, Holland. Davis, Furman, Epstein, Knudson, Narahara. Sitting: Creditor, Chaplin, 
Lasagna, Osborne, Karowe, Osserman. 



ALPHA OMEGA ALPHA 



Maurice M. Osborne, Jr., Pres. 

Harris E. Karowe, Vice Pres. 

Hugh Chaplin, Jr., Secy. 

Louis C. Lasagna, Treas. 

Leonard S. Sommer, Comm. Chairman 

Stanley B. Braham 

Morton C. Creditor 

Walter L. Davis 

Stephen H. Deschamps 



Arthur W. Epstein 
Robert A. Furman 
James F. Holland 
Alfred G. Knudson 
Hiromichi T. Narahara 
Elliott F. Osserman 
Helen M. Ranney 
Sylvester J. Ryan 
Richard J. Stock 



36 



THE OATH OF HIPPOCRATES 



I SWEAR BY APOLLO THE PHYSICIAN' 

AND AESCULAPIUS • AND HEALTH -AND ALL-HEAL - AND ALL THE 
GODS AND GODDESSES - THAT - ACCORDING TO MY ABILITY AND 

JUDGMENT - 1 WILL KEEP THIS OATH AND THIS STIPULATION- 
TO RECKON HIM WHO TAUGHT ME THIS ART EQUALLY DEARTO ME 
AS MY PARENTS - TO SHARE MY SUBSTANCE WITH HIM - & RELIEVE 
HIS NECESSITIES IF REQUIRED - TO LOOK UPON HIS OFFSPRING IN 
THE SAME FOOTING AS MY OWN BROTHERS « AND TO TEACH THEM 
THIS ART • IF THEY SHALL WISH TO LEARN IT - WITHOUT FEE OR 
STIPULATION « AND THAT BY PRECEPT - LECTURE - & EVERY OTHER 
MODE OF INSTRUCTION - 1 WILL IMPART A KNOWLEDGE OF THE ART 
TO MY OWN SONS - AND THOSE OF MY TEACHERS - AND TO DISCIPLES 
BOUND BY A STIPULATION AND OATH ACCORDING TO THELAW OF 
MEDICINE - BUT TO NONE OTHERS-I WILL FOLLOW THAT SYSTEM OF 
REGIMEN WHICH < ACCORDING TO MY ABILITY AND JUDGMENT' I 
CONSIDER FORTHE BENEFIT OF MY PATIENTS - AND ABSTAIN FROM 
WHATEVER IS DELETERIOUS AND MISCHIEVOUS « I WILL GIVE NO 
DEADLY MEDICINE TO ANYONE IF ASKED - NOR SUGGEST ANY SUCH 
COUNSEL • AND IN LIKE MANNER I WILL NOT GIVE TO A WOMAN A 
PESSARY TO PRODUCE ABORTION « WITH PURITY & WITH HOLINESS 
I WILL PASS MY LIFE & PRACTICE MY ART- 1 WILL NOT CUT PERSONS 
LABORING UNDER THE STONE ■ BUT WILL LEAVE THIS TO BE DONE 
BY MEN WHO ARE PRACTITIONERS OF THIS WORK- INTO WHAT- 
EVER HOUSES I ENTER • I WILL GO INTO THEM FOR THE BENEFIT OF 
THE SICK » AND WILL ABSTAIN FROM EVERY VOLUNTARY ACT OF 
MISCHIEF & CORRUPTION « AND FURTHER • FROM THE SEDUCTION 
OF FEMALES OR MALES - OF FREEMEN AND SLAVES -WHATEVER r IN 
CONNECTION WITH MY PROFESSIONAL PRACTICE » OR NOT IN CON- 
NECTION WITH IT ' ISEE OR HEAR » IN THE LIFE OF MEN » WHICH 
OUGHT NOT TO BE SPOKEN OF ABROAD » I WILL NOT DIVULGE AS 
RECKONING THAT ALL SUCH SHOULD BE KEPT SECRET -WHILE I 
CONTINUE TO KEEP THIS OATH UNVIOLATED » MAY IT BE GRANTED 
TO ME TO ENTOY LIFE AND THE PRACTICE OF THE ART' RESPECTED 
BY ALL MEN 'IN ALL TIMES 'BUT SHOULD I TRESPASS AND VIOLATE 
THIS OATH ' MAY THE REVERSE BE MY LOT 










Top Row (L. to R.) : Sillman, Iannone, Sherpick, Fletcher, Bradley, Nydick, Turino, Thompson, Elder, 

Levy, Tator, Robinson, Crecca, Shinefield, Gammill, Smith, Pastel, Fisher. 

3rd Row (I,, to R.) : Amberson, Seibert, Rossa, Adams, French, Etz, Kxakauer, Blair, Lusskin, Horw'itz, 

Holt,' Walser, Burke, Gardner, Gidro-Frank, Kluger, Greenwald, Capeci, Iezzone, Francis. 

2nd Row (L. to R.) : Sayre, Halsted, Bennett, Ollstein, Parker, Zentner, Quintero, Miningham, Jegge, 

Weaver, Mathes, Ottenstein, Meyer, Erlanger, Yealy, Crary. 

Bottom Row (L. to ft. ) : Bard, MacCormack, Krakaur, Shim m, linger, Colp, Bess, Semel, Rogers, 

Bassett, Marshall, Taylor, Talbott, Case, Grumbach. 



THIRD YEAR 





/A 

, Sleep that knits up the ravell'd sleeve of care . . ." 



CLAS S 




'WtuUC '« 



39 




Top Row (t. to R. ) : Marks, Hatterer, Ballantyne, Ward, Couch, Mullen, Payne, Fellows, Fisher, 
Munler, Rossi, Starr, Silver. 

3rd Row (L. to R.) : Kan tor, Gianascol, Smith, Scott, Wyker, Hardy, Wood, Cook, Melia, Johnson, 
Middleton, Zisman, Wallop, Gold, Caputi, Butterworth, Fulop. 

2nd Row (I,, to R.) : Hillcr, Schnur, Paulus, Maclver, Read, Marshall, Brown, D. Marks, Morgan, Davis, 

Jones, Huleatt, Rigney, Blumenthal. 

Bottom Row (I,. to R.) : Fithian, Bcro, Brand, Updike, Brodey, Bacon, Bello, Brill, Boli, Malm. 



SECOND YEAR 




*No ova or parasites seen." 



CLASS 




r 0. f% 




A 



* 







Top Row (L. to R.) : Neuberg, Ritterband, Lucas, Lopez, Allen, Aycrigg, Apthorp, Hume, Nicholas, 

MacKenzie, Blanco-Dalmau, Blake. 

3rd Row (L. to R.) : Pyle, DeYoanna, Colon, Morss, Tompkins, Jaffee, Lebendiger, Gussen, Gross, Adler, 

Messer, DeWitt, Jones, Conroy. 

2nd Row (L. to K.) : Reisner, Burnett, Lewis, Brown, Griffin, Oliver, Edmonds, Kerr, Ling, Estes, 

Moynahan, Crosby, Ackerman. 

Bottom Row (L. to R.) : Wilhelmi, Johnson, Westover, Van Leeuwen, Blair, Wagner, Agzarian, Rizack, 

Parsons, Dorn. 



FIRST YEAR 




first -at, y 



h C C c 




Top Row (L. to R.): Tschudy, Goodbody, Trudean, Wagner, MacDonald, Taylor, Stuhring, Silverberg, 

Ader, Johnsen, Wilson, Dunne. 

2nd Row (L. to R.) : Tamler, Weisbart, Specht, Silbersweig, Snyder, Haul, Feind, Jameson, Glaser, 

Jahn, Jampel, Sioussat, Crandall, Billings. 

Bottom Row (L. to R.) : Weiss, Sarno, Gundell, Linhart, Tepper, Ballantine, Brown, Diefenbach, Dan- 

aher, Van Poznak, Harris, Jones, Junker. 



CIAS S 




C&&AU1+7 



tHRo^ 



44 



VEAttS 




■ I 




4TH YEAR . . . GROUP CLINIC 



INTERNSHIP APPOINTMENTS 



. PLUMBING . . . BELLEVUE 



CHEST . . . COOPERSTOWN . . . 



LEGAL BEAGLE 



MISS 



KEEFE'S VOICE . . 



MULTIP 



ON THE TABLE 





47 



Columfota Umberfittp 

$regbpterian ^osfpttal 

MEDICAL HISTORY 
CLASS OF 1947 
UNIT #86-T1824 

CHIEF COMPLAINT: Vague sensations of 
"Graduation." 

PERSONAL HISTORY: 

1. Born: Between 1917 and 1925 in various 
parts of the United States, Jamaica and Paris, 
not to mention the deep South, but predom- 
inantly in New York City. Nearest thing to 
the tropics for most of the class were short 
trips to the Tropical Gardens and the Ha- 
waiian Room. 

2. Married: 27% (30/113) at last count. 
But values change so quickly that it is diffi- 
cult to keep track. Class as a whole thinks 
marriage is fine. 

3. Habits: Unpredictable and erratic. Class 
says Buckley and Callaway sleep fine at any 
time, but that Braham and Deschamps hardly 
ever sleep. Tea: None. Coffee: Several gal- 
lons o.d. by Miller, Lauderdale, Pitt (nee 
Stewart) and Hehre in A-floor Soda Fountain. 
Tobacco: Innumerable packs o.d. by most, 

Vastola's lip is to the plate. 





Dr. Mcintosh on "porch" rounds. 

and a perpetually fuming, incredibly aro- 
matic pipe 24 hours a day by Dick Lee. Hab- 
its of eating: Ed Vastola shortens plate-to- 
mouth distance to minimum. 

Exercise: A little mayhem in the Bard gym 
by the West Side Athletic club, Rock, Reilly, 
B. Johnson, Stragnell, Martens, Cardon, 
Moley et.al., and Grange Coffin practicing 
weight lifting with piles of Physiological Re- 
views. 

4. Occupation: Class has never done any 
steady work but off and on has taken small 
jobs to pass the time, such as Anatomy, Path- 
ology and Medicine. Most of the time is spent 
in futile efforts at self-analysis and specula- 
tion on the future, and a throat-cutting 
scramble for internships. An enormous 
amount of time is spent in travelling to and 
from various appointments. Several members 
of the Class were unable to reach Bellevue 
more than two or three times in the year, as 
the weather was nice and the train somehow 
mysteriously wound up at Forest Hills and 
the tennis matches. 

5. Weight: Average not known by Class, but 
thinks best weight is in Stu Graves, who 
shows no sign of wasting away. 

PREVIOUS HEALTH AND ILLNESSES: 

General health excellent. 
A. I. D.: None except chicken pox by Muffv 
Miller and Matty Rosenschein after the last 
visit to Willard Parker. 





• 




■ 


1 


1, 






Chaplin . . . Group Clinic . . . 9:30 A. M. 



rid il 



le missus. 





"Sublimation" by Sharp, Austin and Caemmerer. 



Offenkrantz seeks enlightenment 



Immunizations: "Shotgun" immunization of 
most of the Class by Army and Navy, with 
usual sequelae of deltoid myalgia requiring 
absence from Physiology lab. Most members 
effectively immunized against virulent ideas 
by lectures in hot, stuffy, dark ampitheatres. 
Allergies: Finch Parsons said by Class to be 
hypersensitive to humor, being instantly seized 
by anaphylactic spasm of the diaphragm. 
Bilateral phrenic avulsion advocated, but not 
as yet carried out. 

Operations and Injuries: Five men lost after 
First, six after and during Second year and 
two lost after Third year. Six fresh, healthy 
Alabama and Dartmouth men grafted on in 
Third year. Graft apparently took well. 



HEAD: 

Headaches: One very severe by Jim Reilly 
after his excursion into alcoholism. 
Eyes: Watch Sidbury without his glasses. 
ENT: Almost constant pojt-nasal drip, rhin- 
orrhea and vigorous self treatment with 
drops, instillations and nuchal hyperexten- 
sion by Pete Mangan in lecture, on rounds, 
and at lunch in the Alps. 

RESPIRATORY: A few symptoms of ex- 
piratory hyperventilation, with stridor, pro- 
ductive of 2-3 bucketfuls o.d. of Cant, tru- 
isms, bland references to "My Experience" 
and journalese. Particularly distressing on 
rounds. 



49 



CARDIAC: Frequent palpitations during the 
first two years chiefly in connection with 
examinations . . . have diminished with ap- 
pointment to internships. Recurrent pre- 
cordial twinges cured in each case by getting 
married to the cause. 

G.I. : Mild dysphagia encountered by attempt- 
ing to swallow the Freudian doctrine too fast. 

G.U. : Class was either too reticent or too ver- 
bose and overanxious to get to this part of 
the history to permit accurate appraisal. Con- 
sidering the nature of the Class, there were 
surprisingly few incidents of Methylenuria. 

NEUROMUSCULAR: Some very interesting 
and unorthodox convulsions had by Noch 
Callaway following a hotfoot in Clinical 
Anatomy, Type unknown. 

EMOTIONAL: Class as a whole demonstrates 
great lack of orientation, with persistent hal- 
lucinations of success, illusions of being sav- 
iours of the human race, or at least of being 
contributors to science and frequent neol- 
ogisms or "word-salads" and is, in short, 
probably schizophrenic. In its rare contacts 



with reality, it tends to violent forms of 
amusement such as beer parties, trips in 
Model A Fords to Vassar, dances on the 11th 
floor of Bard, and occasionally, a daring trip 
to the almost unknown regions south of 59th 
street. However it always regresses to ite 
former state. At least two of its members have 
been observed to act out their hallucinatory 
experiences in public, Gabe d'Amato and 
Matty Rosenschein. 

PRESENT ILLNESS 

The Class's trouble dates back to January 
1944 when it registered for school at 630 
West 168th Street, although it feels there 
may have been vague symptoms as early as 
a year before when it sent for the application 
blanks. Disregarding these earlier manifesta- 
tions, however, we find the real syndrome be- 
ginning with a combination of Anatomy, His- 
tology and Embryology early in January. At 
first ill-defined and fleeting, these troubles 
soon settled into non-radiating, fixed, nagging, 
boring, gnawing pains, relieved only by deep 
sleep or a weekend, only to return with re- 
newed force afterwards. Often, in a particu- 
larly severe attack of Anatomy, the patient in 
desperate search for relief, as shown by Tom 



Osborne views latest communique Drs. McCune and Alexander after hours Life- u 6aviour" Luttrell 





Dr. Draper: 
speaking . 



Cahill, constitutionally 




Food for thought 



and your interpretation, doc- 




r 

i 



Confederate Headquarters 




Scanlan, Jeff Wheelwright, Mac Oiborne and 
Pete Hyslop would be driven to singing quar- 
tets in the lab or importing illicit beer. The 
patient complained of a haunting undefinable 
odor which seemed to hang around him 
wherever he went, and began to have per- 
secutory feelings of avoidance by people in 
the elevator. The Class was learning to par- 
tially relieve itself of Histology by readjust- 
ing its microscopes to look at its neighbors' 
faces, and had begun to become accustomed 
to its complaints when a series of new and 
baffling symptoms seized it . . . perpetual 
fatigue and somnolence, particularly in 
Neuroanatomy lectures. These new attacks 
usually started out by a buzzing in the ears, 
at first distinctly saying "... great ascending 
tract, crossing over like this, and wandering 
off into the fields of the Substantia Nigra, 
..." but this soon became fainter and 
fainter, and finally fading out altogether. At 
first the Class made frantic efforts to stay 
awake, with Bob Donauer and Frank Dree- 
dale writing valiantly in the fading light of 
25e flashlights, but soon would be largely 
asleep. This was not a too distressing symp- 
tom to the Class till it tried it out in Dr. 
Stookey'8 lectures, where it gave way to acute 
anxiety as the relentless questions jangled 
them violently into trembling consciousness. 

In the spring the entire class was seized 
with a paroxysm of Physiology, which lasted 
through the rest of the year, unrelieved ex- 
cept for illuminating comments on the phil- 
osophy of the "wagi" by the local Confucius. 
A course in Biochemistry was instituted at 
this time, with some relief and considerable 
diuresis. The only untoward result of this 
was the finding of some sugar in Rog Unger's 
specimen, carefully placed there by Jim 
Trimble: and Roger's pathetic appeals to his 
friends to stick by him in his diabetic con- 
dition. 

In September 1944 there was a violent out- 
burst of all symptoms in the formes frustes 
called Examinations, and five members suc- 
cumbed completely. For the others, however, 
there followed a remarkable remission for 
about two weeks from which Terhune re- 
appeared with a Model-A Ford, which was 




Muffv and Pearl 



to afford considerable relief from symptoms 
of many of the Class. 

The patient soon found that a fresh set of 
symptoms had appeared from those of the 
First Year, and in some instances as constant, 
but by and large, the Class had begun to take 
its troubles for granted, and to talk of them 
with the fond whine of a true hypochondriac. 
True, some continued to crack and Grange 
Coffin began to take out hi6 aggressions with 
some histamine on a bunch of rabbits on 0- 
Floor, as well as with some flawless Bach on 
the Bard piano. Jim Reilly became a con- 
firmed alcoholic for the most hilarious hour 
ever seen by F-ampitheatre, and one of Ken 
Lewis' long bones got dislocated and turned 
up under his microscope in Amateur Hour. 
However, most of the Class were settling re- 
signedly into their invalidism, and were buy- 
ing stethoscopes, opthalmoscopes, tuning 
forks, rubber hammers and measuring tapes 
at a furious rate and sticking them into the 
pockets of their white coats. 



52 



The first time the Class may be said to have 
noticed sex was when the four female mem- 
bers of the group began to disappear during 
the Physical Diagnosis sessions, and for a 
while, the males had a glimmering that there 
was something different about the girls after 
all, and that it might be quite intriguing. 
Some date the commencement of Bill Abel's 
researches earlier than this, but we prefer 
to describe this as the turning point. The 
marriage rate which had been low, soared 
after this stage, Chaplin, Foster, Hindman, 
Holland, Hyslop, Jonassen, Lewis, Little, 
Rock and Stock becoming interested in rapid 
succession. Others, either more doubtful or 
less virile, were to follow. 

With the Third Year the most violent 
symptoms had subsided and the Class was 
seen to be subjected to a subacute condition, 
gradually becoming irreversible, of progres- 
sively split personality. There were Medical, 
Surgical and Specialty facets of the ailment, 
the latter subdivided around five symptoms. 



More food for thought 





Cylroen establishes rapport 



In the Medical side of the picture were evi- 
dent very disturbing derangements . . . illu- 
sions of grandeur, with assumption of vast 
knowledge, word-salads apparently derived 
from the Journals, but having no relation to 
reality, and inappropriate laughter. Many 
of the Class undergoing this phase showed an 
interesting symbolization of the common 
deities in Loeb, Atchley and Kneeland, with 
occasionally an interesting mother-symbol 
seen in the worship of Knowlton or Boyle. 
Also the Class was observed to have an ab- 
normal and almost constant preoccupation 
with stools, urine and human blood, which 
they would examine by the hour, even to the 
exclusion of other functions. Numerous ani- 
mal fantasies were recorded, . . . Bill Offen- 



Bet it's a- 




krantz imagined he had seen a whale in a 
specimen and reported it as '"unremarkable" 
to his attending. 

That part of the Class in the so-called 
''Surgical" Phase of the disease displayed a 
great apathy, disinclination to talk and a pe- 
culiar form of Cerea Flexibilitas which they 
called "Second-Assisting" from which many- 
could be aroused only by a rap on the 
knuckles with a clamp by Dr. Whipple, a 
savage personal attack by Dr. Haagensen, but 
seldom by anything else. The only known 




", . . and to teach them this art . . ." 

person to make an impression on this part of 
the Class was Dr. V. K. Frantz, who, instead 
of examining them, plied them with beer 
and pretzels and succeeded in getting a few 
of them to talk. There were a few hyper- 
kinetic episodes, with extreme anxiety dur- 
ing a week on Anesthesia, in which sub- 
jects would be heard to whisper hoarsely, 

"Oh God! Oh God!! Machine's running away 
with me . . . machine's running away with 
me!!!" Frequent appeals to a goddess named 
Apgar were made also during this period. 
But certainly the most bizarre symptoms 

53 



were seen in the Specialty phase. Here the 
Class wandered aimlessly from clinic to clinic, 
occasionally getting as far as Montefiore Hos- 
pital. This was perhaps the happiest stage, as 
they had very little to do, but there was some- 
thing pathetic about it, for the Class in this 
phase showed slight degrees of insight into 
its condition and began to grope back with 
trembling hands for the old normality of life. 
They played basketball and Moley got into 
fights. They played squash and Osserman and 
Gordon rose from comparative obscurity to 
near-brilliance. They played bridge and 
Buckley, Hyslop, Stragnell et. al., took the 
crowd. They made music and Al Sherwin, 
Gabe d'Amato, and, to a lesser extent, Al 
Caemmerer and Mac Osborne gave the Grand 
Piano a hard time. They witnessed sports 
and Charlie Yergan, Howie Wilson and their 
consorts outdid the sportswriters. They fell 
in love and Bob Hagstrom could be seen 
everywhere with his girl. They began, in 
short, to see how far they were gone in the 



Great Medical Psychosis, and to make des- 
perate amends, but it was too late. 

For Fourth Year was beginning, and some 
of them who had been to Bellevue, Roose- 
velt or Cooperstown came back with the dam- 
aging news that there were other people 
JUST LIKE THEM! And so the final decline 
into happy unawareness of disease began. 

No longer did they feel that there was 
anything queer about wearing a stethoscope 
to the theatre, and they became ultimately 
split into four distinct phases; Medicine and 
Surgery, Obstetrics and Gynecology, Pedia- 
trics and Urology, and Bellevue. What's more 
they obviously did not care, but gleefully re- 
counted and lived out their symptoms as if 
they were entirely normal. And there is the 
devilish part, because they actually began to 
look normal. No longer the cowering, suffer- 
ing, miserable herd of First Year, aware of 
every assault on sanity, they now confidently, 
proudly, and effectively blazoned their state 
to as much of the world as would listen. It 





Scanlan 


and Sidbury 




■^2^^^ 


JB-- 


kLJfl 




^ 


"> | 






_j 




\fm ' -^^^ 






_ ♦ 







Jim Reilly in the Blood Bank 




Freddie and the flamethrower 



BuddyM! 




}** 




-^L-J 




Maestro Sherwin directs 



Karowe and Little keeping up to date 



Christmas party, 1946 
"Oh, Holy Night" . . . 
Hazlehurst 



began to seem perfectly right for Fred Hehre 
to seem like an obstetrician, for Alex Caem- 
merer to turn one's every remark into a pro- 
found psychosexual revelation, and for Jim 
Monteith to be seen lovingly fingering a #12 
French catheter. That Chaplin could spend 
his youth sidling up to a cageful of recalci- 
trant guinea-pigs with a syringe was no longer 
an insult, but a happy confirmation . . . we 
were all crazy. The business of intemeshipe 
only strengthened the delusion . . . true, some 
of the Class missed out and were terribly dis- 
appointed, but certainly if they had been 
sane they would have gone cheerfully into 
bootlegging or some such recognized industry. 
Now the Class approaches graduation, which 
is, in 99.9% of the cases equivalent with ir- 
revocable tenure of the Medical Frame of 
Mind. The prognosis from here on is ex- 
tremely guarded, except that the Class will 
find many thousands like themselves, happy 
eccentrics, and the best thing to find will be 
that they are not all in Medicine. 



Pediatrics conference 







Rounds at Goldwater 






* 



h 



Buck plays a hard one 



Oil immersion . . . Narahara 



Lauderdale and the "Times 11 



PHYSICAL 





FINDINGS 



Nicholas, don't be ridiculous! 

Dr. D'Esopo dons working clothes 




3RD YEAR . . . MEDICINE 



ROUNDS 



SHIFTING DULL- 



NESS 



RETRACTORS 



QUICK LOOK AT THE SPECIAL- 



TIES . . . ATCHLEY HISTORIES 



. CBC'S . . . BLOODS 



VENI PUNCTURE 
ON THE WARDS 





59 




Dr. Atchley's rounds 



Jrm piercing shriek and a blood-spattered 
naked woman dashed down the hall, followed 
by a blood-spattered Erlanger wielding a 
venous pressure machine with aseptic tech- 
nique. Thi6 awoke the disinterested clerks 
who weren't nodding in assent to Domenic's 
exhaustive review of "Paroxysmal Furuncu- 
losis." Dropping their bridge hands, Tator, 
Nydick, Kluger and Pastel rushed out of the 
doctor's station and tripped over a stooping 
mass, which proved on further inspection to 
be Carl Alexander, tucking in the leg of his 
union suit. Bassett, setting down his glass of 
Lord Calvert's, also joined the milling mob, 
attired impeccably in one of his Finch- 
ley-tailored long white lab coats. Putting 
aside the galley-proofs of his newest book, 
"How To Live Calmly Under Tension," May- 
nard quickly restored order. The group there- 
fore resigned themselves to the task of begin- 
ning rounds. 

At the first bed, Dottie looked lovingly at 
Jim while he read the thermometer. They 
were not surprised to find Ted Capeci with a 
temperature of 112°, suffering from Kuh 
fever. Norma Keitel smiled benignly on the 
multip ( 14th child ) across the ward. And the 
wave of common understanding that spread 
between two such "Old Troupers" pervaded 
all the rest of the room and left the clerks 
with a feeling of unmistakable pseudocyesis. 
Gene Sillman quickly broke the spell of 

60 



this "Momism" in the group by his off-stage 
remark, "Everyone's trying to get into the 
act." Talbot groped his way to the next bed, 
assisted by Cricket, his Seeing Eye dog, and 
thereupon ordered 50 gms. of paraldehyde 
stat for the patient, whom all others recog- 
nized as "Rip Van" Ottenstein, suffering from 
incurable somnolence, as a sequellae to the 
previous week's parasitology lecture on "The 
Statistical Significance Between Yesterday's 
Bard Hall Hash and Today's Bouef a la Mode 
Jardiniere de Fifi McDonald." 

This incident brought a smile to the lips 
of Don Blair, who was quickly burned to 
death over an open alcohol lamp flame by his 
fellow students who resented his over- 
indulgent emotional display. Moving on, the 
group found Messrs. Lester and Polatin hold- 
ing up Rorschach Card No. 3 in front of a 
senile psychotic, who immediately reacted 
by yelling, "I know. It's a Grumbach!!" The 
peace was again disturbed by inflexible Joe 
Bennett, who insisted for the 17th time that 
it was only 9:30, even though Larry War- 
basse's 5 o'clock shadow contested this point. 
Fisher, content with the accuracy of Stand- 
ard Warbasse Time, left for the Sterility clin- 
ic, brushing aside Dr. Gregersen, who was 
standing in the doorway attired in a T-1824 
(Evan's Blue) suit, with a curt, "I haven't 
got time now, sonny, see me some other time." 

Aufses DEMANDED that an immediate bi- 
lateral pneumonectomy be done on the next 
patient, whose only complaint up to that 



Dr. Loeb expounds 














m 


\ 


1 a 


W T^ 






JH 





time had been epidermophytosis of the left 
big toe. 

At the next bed, Siebert explained that the 
patient's great grand aunt had lived at 32 
Cuaiac Boulevard, Kabul, Afganistan, and 
smoked Bugler's pipe tobacco. Jim Gammill 
endeared himself to twenty members of the 
group who concealed themselves behind his 
petite silhouette to avoid the searing gaze of 
Dr. ^ erner. 

Mary Stu modestly retired from the group, 
as thev and Dr. Wegria began a heated dis- 
cussion about the P-wave. Late, as usual, 
Janie Magill was in convulsive laughter be- 
cause of Dan Choy's caricature of the morn- 
ing's gynecological session, and of Mining- 
ham's caricature of Choy at said session. Not 
far behind, but also late, were French and 
Francis, with sleeping bags and elephant 
guns, who had just returned from a weekend 
hunting trip on the grounds of Maxwell Hall. 

At this moment the ward FROZE LN ITS 
TRACKS!! Bedpans fell!! Four orderlies 



blew silver trumpets, and Drs. Loeb, Palmer 
and Hanger quickly took their places, pros- 
trating themselves on the floor, as Lothar 
Gidro-Frank, attired in royal ermine, stepped 
from his litter onto the purple carpet which 
two groveling internes rolled before him, 
used his riding crop to bludgeon Saver in the 
kidneys for having dropped his end of the 
sedan chair and proceeded to do a WBC 
and Diff on his patient, with the running 
commentary, "Look, no hands!!" 

In his wake, Bob Campbell, in chartreuse 
tights, pirouetted into the swirling mists of 
the Utility room, there to find the contem- 
plative Bunker in one of his mesmeric reve- 
ries. 

Close on Campbell's heels was Bob Adams, 
untwisting his opera cape which had be- 
come all fouled "up with the librettos of 
Ernie Aitelli's great new peoples' opera, "The 
B.V.D.'s Itcheth." 

It was rumored through the halls that 
Bob Gardner had been arrested for emptying 



Sink test 



The orthopods 




Every Thursday afternoon 





In third year we assist 




the mustard pots at the Yalta, secreting the 
contents in. a skillfully concealed receptacle 
in his sports coat, to later use the rare mater- 
ial for his new research project. Then Meph- 
am burst into the Treatment room and waved 
an ecclesiastical admonishing finger at Sween- 
ey and Etz who were playing "Monopoly" 
with two Maxwell queens (Miss Conrad take 
note!!!). 

The group was accused en masse of doing 
off with one of Dick Krakaur's Drosophilia, 
Metchnikoff by name, one of the 5000 beast- 
ie6 which inhabit his modest research labora- 





Drs. Humphreys and Whipple 

Dr. Atchley nodded approvingly as Herb 
Peyser remarked that the history of the pa- 
tient, a member of N.Y.C.'s Sewage Disposal 
Corps, was incomplete, especially when Herb 
suggested the following diagnostic questions: 
"Do you find that on waking up in the morn- 
ing you have a feeling that you have been 
asleep? Does your cocker spaniel have Pink 
Tooth Brush? When sailing on your yacht, 
do you sleep with the porthole open or 
closed?" Given satisfactory answers to these 
questions, the diagnosis of "Suprahypopyo- 
enteroplacebotitic Syndrome" was made, also 
known as Schmidlapp-Ficklefinger's Disease. 

At this point, Joe Parker dropped to the 



"Doctors, this man has a sick liver.' 

tory at the end of the lab, which by the way 
is dedicated to the memory of Joshua Leder- 
berg. From the other end of the lab came 
cries of excitement, when Gloria refused to 
take the two dollars payment in Confederate 
notes, which Mathes had been fined for mix- 
ing mint juleps in the venous clotting time 
tub. 

Back in the ward, Jim Marshall fascinated 
the gathering by trying to revive his latest 
anesthesia victim by reading stimulating quo- 
tations from the day's stock market reports. 



EKG's . . . Corona Corona . . . Dr. Wegria 



62 




floor, weak from the exhaustion of carrying 
his 39 volumes of notes from the last six Pub- 
lic Health lectures. Dr. Bull happened to 
amble through the ward, and a voice, un- 
mistakably Shinefield's, was heard to say, in 
no less than 40 decibels, "Gee, Fellows! ! Isn't 
Dr. Bull a suh-well guy?" Disgusted with all 
these Gairns-on, Blair Rogers stalked out of 
the ward, waving his New Yorker in one 
hand, and remarked, "Ugh ! ! Yumpin' Yim- 
miny, Ay tank Ay go bek to Sveden!!" 



Research is indispensable 



Dr. Cannon shows the boys 



"Moral suasion" 






a-1 



* I J 




Ijri 






nents into place'* 


ENT with Dr. Wallner 




Technique: Silk. 




Attending* 1 row 




Dr. Nolan, D. C. Lewis 




Surgical Staff conference 


. George Perera 


Applied anatomy 






\ 



2ND YEAR . . . NEURO AT MON- 



TEFIORE 



COLORED BUGS 



THE ART OF AUSCULTA- 



TION 



MAGIC DRUGS . . . 



WORMS . . . DOG SURGEONS . . 



GROSS PATH DEMONSTRA- 



TIONS 



ACTOPS IES 




66 




67 



M he advent of the twentieth century "Forty- 
niners" took place on October 1, 1945, when 
a motley group of "swab-jockeys," "dog-faces" 
and civilians, and er-ah-h-h females, for the 
want of better nomenclature, attained the 
distinction of being termed medical students. 
On that day, those who matriculated from a 
naval hospital were to embark on a journey 
in which they were to learn that the Navy's 
"head" was a bit different from that which 
the anatomy department was to teach them, 
while those who found their way through the 
ASTP course were to find that the term "G.I." 
also had another meaning. 

.Our class is first in many respects. We are 
the first post- World War II class to enter the 
realms of Rappleye, Severinghaus, et. al. We 
are the first to contain such a large number 
of international mouse units of estrogen. 

Our early days found us wandering between 
amphitheatre-H, the histology lab, and that 
den of horrors, the Anatomy lab. After the 
class had adjusted itself and taken a few 
quizzes — (for the benefit of the unindoctrin- 
ated, a quiz may last anywhere from ten min- 
utes to four hours) — certain little anecdotes 
began to appear, either about the faculty or 
the class. Among the former is one concern- 
ing a prominent member of the Histology 





Dr. Van Dyke, pharmacology 

dept. One of our esteemed classmates was 
riding up to the ninth floor in order to take 
the Histology final, when he found that he 
and the aforementioned faculty member 
were the only passengers on that mechan- 
ical pogo-stick (referred to by the more elite 
as an elevator). Looking for conversation, our 
hero asked his companion, "I suppose you're 
not as nervous as I am this morning?" A 
whispered response, "Uh-h, what was that?" 
Again he inquired and this time received the 
answer, "No, it wasn't too crowded on the 
subway this morning." 

In the following months the Anatomy lab 
saw much activity. Heinrich Himmler Truex 
and his cohorts descended on us in force, 
snatching 9tudent anatomists at random from 
the peace and quiet of the perineum, in or- 
der to take them to the Buchenwald of the 
Anatomy lab, a lonely cadaver in the corner. 
About the same time a long haired blonde 
began modeling musculature for an eminent 
neuro-surgeon. 

Other courses came and went, all having 
their anecdotes, but none to compare with 
that which took place in the Monday Physi- 
ology lab, when a few overzealous neophytic 
doctors, having a custom of post-experimental 
review of the anatomy of the cat, introduced 
an embryo into the thorax via a slight slit 
in the diaphragm. An unsuspicious member 



Dr. Dochez, bacteriology 



Gross pathology session 



of this group, whom I will refer to as J.C., 
very anxious to dissect his allotted portion 
(naturally the thorax I, went about his work, 
and soon the lab walls were heard to echo, 
"Hey, fellows! Look! An ectopic pregnancy!" 
Of course, none of you could know that we 
had a physiologist in his incipience in our 
midst. He is R.B., who has done much re- 
search on Gazelle Units. Such research was 
precipitated as a result of his inquiry (after 
recovering from a short slumber ) of a class- 
mate as to what the units along the abscissa 
of a graph represented. His classmate, eager 
to help his fellow, told him they were the 
aforementioned Gazelle units. Nothing more 
was said until our research physiologist raised 
the question to the conductor of one of the 
conference sections. Needless to say, R.B. 
nearly went into shock, due to the increase 
in volume of the capillary beds lying in his 
facial epithelium. 

Our Class soon had become well amalgam- 
ated, and we elected our first year officers, 



who were responsible in a large part for the 
two successful parties held while they were 
in office. They were: Jack Smith, president; 
Marvin Brodey, vice-president; and Nonie 
Tapley, secretary-treasurer. Prior to this elec- 
tion, we had broken a precedent by making 
a provision for the annual election of class 
officers. 

Further organization was seen when a sex- 
tet appeared, consisting of Middleton, John- 
son, Wallop, Butterworth, Fifer and Neun- 
schwander, whose close harmony was only 
excelled by that of the Physiology Dept. 
when asked by one of their number if they 
were in agreement with him. 

An important occurance in our first year 
was the metamorphosis from the service to 
civilian life which was experienced by all of 
us, either objectively or subjectively. The 
eclectics of sartorial elegance manifested 
themselves in various ways, the most promi- 
nent being the ties which bore a remarkable 
resemblance to many pathology drawings. 

69 




This year saw us electing as class officers: 
Worm IVeslen, president; Nonie Tapley, vice- 
president; and Yvie Townsend, secretary- 
treasurer. Already we have had one fine party, 
and others will materialize (after pathology, 
no doubt ) . 

Up to the moment of writing, much path- 
ology has gone by the board, the department 
being aided ( ? ) to no little degree by mem- 
bers of the class who profess to be profes- 
sors. A bit of news which I picked up the 
other day from the department is that they 
are in the process of grooming a protege 
whom they luckily discovered in our midst. 
B.E. is the discoverer of a new liver lesion, 
a circumcised infarct. 

Much food has passed through the gut, and 
many of us have attempted to increase the 
efficiency of the Bacteriology Department 
through its solicited suggestions. We are well 
on our way to attain notoriety if we manage 
to pass through the present famine persisting 
at Bard Hall. 

And now I see that the "Plaster room" has 
finished laundering our white coats, so I'd 
better see Charlie and get mine so that I can 
start prying open the pockets and pushing 
my upper extremities into the sleeves. 

Dr. Homer Kesten 





Surgical path with Dr. V. K. Frantz 



Wednesday evening concert 



Off the backboard 




1ST YEAR . . . ANATOMY LAB 



PURKINJE FIBERS . . . PYRA- 



MIDAL DECUSSATIONS 



SMOKED DRUMS . . . CARBOHY- 



DRATE CYCLES . . . CORRELA- 



TION LECTURES 



AXD M ORE 
AX ATOMY 




72 




4& 



73 




Jfou saw the class of 1950 arriving. The 
day was the twelfth of September, 1946. There 
were 112 of us, all very different in some ways 
and alike in others. We came from all over 
the country, from Europe and Asia too. 
Thirty-six states are represented, and fifty- 
seven colleges. With that many schools, you 
can see that no particular school is repre- 
sented by many people. Maybe you haven't 
heard of some of our alma maters. "It's a 
small college, but there are those who love 
her." Ask Ralph Junker, who's from Carle- 
ton, or Dwight Morss who's from Ursinus. 

A few of us decided we were going to be 
doctors years ago. For some of us, the war 
interrupted our plans, and seventy-seven of 
us are veterans. Some fought in Europe, or 
in the Pacific, or flew a bomber over the 
Ruhr, or parachuted into Burma or Indb- 
China for the O.S.S. One of us was shot down 
over Germany, another was with the Swedish 
Navy, another in the Dutch underground. We 
sailed with the amphibious fleet, with Task 
Force 58, and in subs into Japanese waters. 
Others of us trained in the states, or trained 
others to go overseas. 

Please don't assume we're an average bunch. 
We may look alright, but there isn't anyone 
who exactly fits an average. We run all the 
way from Julia Ling up. Julia is the smallest, 
but where the top is I don't know. Dan De- 
Witt still had his hand up when the prof 
got up above 190 pounds. The prof wanted 
the maximum for comparison, looked at Dan 



74 



Dr. Detwiler 



and said, "How about 195?" "Keep going, 
Doc!'' Dan cried. 

Having seen "Miss Susie Slagle's" we weren't 
prepared for its latter day counterpart, Bard 
Hall, with its transient elevator men shouting 
"OP!" and making like a yo-yo around every 
stop. The College presented elevator prob- 
lems too, in the personalities of the elevator 
operators. The day one of the cars went 
through the roof, the hope was expressed 
that "Old Smiley" was at the controls and 
went through with it. 

^ e got our white coats, carefully selecting 
the ones with the P&S pocket patch, and 
struck up an acquaintance with George El- 
liot, our caterer in fine books for the next 
four years. Albert checked us out cadavers 
and bone boxes. Dave Reisner didn't open 
his, assuming that it was necessary to collect 
the bones as each area of dissection was fin- 
ished, and carefully locked his in the locker. 

During the next week we attended labs 
for the whole period, but Ivy-league football 
weekends took a toll of Saturday attendance 
in Anatomy. First week confusions were 
straightened out. Ray Jaffe found out that 
H&E on a slide label didn't mean Histology 
and Embryology, and the hospital found out 
that the first forty chest x-rays of the class 
had identical shadows in the right lung, 
proving a similarity between us that no one 
had suspected. 

It was discovered that ninety minutes of 
an evening could easily be spent nourishing 
the body in the Bard Grille, and Stan Gross 

"So round, so firm . . . 





Microanatomist, Dr. P. E. Smith 



"The petrous portion . . ." 



made the mistake of being the last to leave a 
table on which an ingenious pyramid of 
bottles and plates had been built. Stella 
nailed him and gave him detailed instruc- 
tions for several turgid minutes while he un- 
stacked and restacked them on the serving 
table. A custom was initiated that included 
coffee at the Alps or Rand's during Histology 
lab. 

First dissection was hectic. ^S e proceeded 
with caution into the abdomen, and disclosed 
an organ tentatively identified as the spleen. 
"Before we remove it," suggested Arnie Rit- 
terband, "we'd better be sure whether its a 
right spleen or a left one." 

Dr. Gramlich cautioned us about working 
on the elbow: "You've got to be careful what 
you do around this joint." 

Correlation lectures opened our eyes and 
Dr. Draper proved how little we observed 
when a score of us had peered into a patient's 
face without noticing his glass eye. Our other- 
wise excellent powers of observation have 



been noted in medical practice as a syn- 
drome, bearing the name of one of the class, 
recognized as rotation of head, stimulated 
by passage of well-turned ankle. 

We watched operations, and were as ill at 
ease as the patient below, who, under local 
anesthesia, was still curious enough to ask 
a nurse who the people were in the balcony 
and then to thumb his nose at them. Al Sny- 
der, with considerable presence of mind, 
thumbed his right back. 

First examinations made us pale. Maury 
Goodbody predicted, as the bell rang in the 
Anatomy practical, that the only thing right 
on his paper would be his name. Dwight 
Morss turned in an Histology paper and ad- 
mitted that he couldn't recognize liver unless 
it had two slices of bacon around it. A 
thought provoking poster tacked up by 
George Harris, queried, "Why gamble on 
your future? Join the U.S. Army." 

We celebrated the end of the first dissec- 
tion with our first class party. There was 



75 



plenty of beer, mostly in barrels with re- 
luctant bungs. Al Lebendiger allowed that 
he could end this difficulty with a hammer 
and gave the bystanders a beer bath. 

Five o'clock on Friday seemed to indicate 
Armory Bar and Grille to Jim Apthorp, Mike 
Hume, and Gil Burnett. Over the mahogony 
they got into a profound discussion with a 
refrigeration expert about a mysterious plas- 
tic bird that perpetually drank from a jigger 
on the cash register. They are now joined 
there every Friday by a score of rare bird 
fanciers, including Jean Donaher, Buck 
Jones, Greg Jameson, Lou Pyle and others. 
The refrigeration expert has been appointed 
to the Audubon Chair in the Department of 
Ornithology. 

Dr. Truex, trying to approximate the posi- 
tion of a cadaver with a plaster model of the 
pelvis, said, "This is probably the view most 
of you are getting of this area." The broad 
wooden base of the model's stand was all that 
was visible from where most of us were sit- 
ting. 

Two class babies came after Thanksgiving: 
Thomas Bardon Goodbody and Richard Shep- 
ard. 

The wind that blows around the corner of 
Bard blew Cynia Brown off the sidewalk and 
into the street. A first year octet including 
John Sarno, John Wilson, Mike Hume, Chuck 
Blair, Houston Westover, George Aycrigg, 
Doug Tompkins and Dwight Morss began to 
practice for the Christmas party. Bob Mc- 
Kenna won the squash tournament, and five 
basketball enthusiasts, Livy Parsons, Chuck 
Crandall, Charley Lewis, Bob McKenna and 
Doug Tompkins beat a team from Psychiatric. 
The center from Psychiatric remarked, "You 
may notice that some of the other four tend 
to get a little excited." 

New courses were introduced. Dr. Elwyn 
made every effort to keep the class with him 
in lecture. Those awakening with a start 
learned to recognize his gestures. When he 
motioned above his head he was describing 
the ascending spinal tracts, when he rubbed 
his stomach he was discussing the mid-brain, 
and 60 on down to the hind-brain. Dr. Stookey 



1 *'-^ "™ « t «... 



nfl 




To the end point 



Maximum stimulus? 



76 




stimulated a whole gamut of reflexes — hys- 
terical paralysis, spastic tongue-tie, and a 
tendency to look around to the next person 
when pointed at. However we managed to 
make our point in the amphitheatre when 
necessary. Bob Sioussat and Jim Foulks gave 
able demonstration of the thumb and fifth 
finger with a Boy Scout salute. Audrey Brown 
demonstrated pilmotor control by skin-pinch- 
ing even when the patient insisted on putting 
his arm around her. 

The Christmas party arrived and Aimee 
Diefenbach and Tom Cheves helped decorate 
the Bard Hall Lounge. There was a huge 
dance, eggnogg, and the Glee Club sang. 

As the snow fell outside the anatomy lab 
the next afternoon, the clas6 put away the 
first term's work, and sang Christmas carols 
all over again. 

The New Year ushered in a jingle: 

"Little Jack Horner sat in the corner, 

Displaying his symptoms three, 

A pupil small, a sunken eyeball, 

And a lid that drooped down to his knee." 





Dr. Raymond C. Truex 



Dr. Elwyn considered the morality of the 
loose fiber tracks, and John Dunne took a pro- 
fessor completely off guard by announcing, 
when presented by a hand so deformed that 
it looked like a foot: "Obviously a nerve in- 
jury." 

In Physiology lab, Ray Wilhelm was so 
hyperventilated that he produced a windbag 
containing 21.4 liters, and Doug Tompkins 
celebrated the fir6t Biochem lab by taking 
up 50 cc. more of dichromate cleaning solu- 
tion than his pipette would hold. After treat- 
ment, he explained, "It tastes rather like a 
hangover." For the benefit of those who have 
never tasted dichromate solution, and of 
course, those who have never had a hang- 
over . . . 



'Twas the night before 



77 





Dr. Stetten, biochemist 



Octet minus V-fa 



Bauman presents Dean's Cup to squash champ 
McKenna 





Dr. Edgar G. Miller 



Dr. Henry A. Riley 




Dr. Nickerson and magic machine 



Dr. Washburn 





In the evening by the fire . . . 





Standing: Krakauer, Grumbach, Rigney, Krakanr, Jameson, Parker, Cox, Diefenbach, Couch, Johnson, 
Malm, Hume, Burtan. Sitting: Long, Miller, Donauer, Cytroen, Hehre, Lukas, A. Diefenbach, Bassett. 



YEARBOOK STAFF 




Just a minute* Dae 



We'd like to have a few words with you on the prenatal course of this 
yearbook. 

At the very onset we were faced with an early threatened abortion on the 
basis of impecunity. Were it not for the kind and hearty financial ministrations 
of our patrons, P & S '47 would have gone the way of all defective embryos. 

There were a myriad of other problems and tasks, and a host of people with 
assorted talents willingly came to the fore to grapple with them. Some, we feel, 
extended themselves "above and beyond the call of duty," and in general proved 
to be of comfort in time of trial. 

We cite Bill Bauman, who, as treasurer of the organization, not only ruled 
the coffers with an exacting hand, but gave freely of his services on many occa- 
sions; Andy Bassett, technical adviser and chief quartermaster of the Photogra- 
phy Committee, whose shots were taken with a Speed Graphic, generously 
loaned by Bill Cox; Jim Couch, who wrote the second year chronicle between 
shooting pictures; Rupert Burtan, indefatigable as a cameraman and gentle 
gadfly to the entire Photography Committee; Finch Parsons, who almost single- 
handedly tackled the momentous and monumentous task of enlisting patrons; 
Muffy Miller, manager of circulation and publicity; Aime Diefenbach, whose 
influence was felt in many fields; Brother Bill Diefenbach, creator of cartoons 
and the cover design; Frank Rigney and Bill Miningham, the results of whose 
satirical brushes are in evidence on the section dividers and elsewhere; Mac 
Osborne, author of the fourth year story; a group of four third-year gentlemen 
who prefer to remain as "Alcoholics Unanimous"; Mike Hume, who in the first 
year chronicle brought back the memories of that fearful year; Ed Long, pro- 
curer of advertisements and doer of necessary odd jobs; Tom Guthrie, who 
patiently read and blue-penciled proofs; Mr. Fullweiler of the Public Relations 
Dept. of Presbyterian Hospital, who provided us with some pictures; and Mr. 
John Jackson of the Campus Publishing Co., patient and reassuring as chief 
physician and obstetrician to P & S '47. 

We further cite Perry Austin, Joe Di Caprio, John Peck, George Hazlehurst, 
Tom Scanlan, Alex Caemmerer, Charlie Benton, Les Martens, Dick Krakaur and 
Henry Krakauer, Dom Iezzone, Joe Parker, Jim Malm and Dune Johnson for 
their work with the Business Committee; Greg Jameson for his editorial efforts; 
and Ole Jonassen and Vance Lauderdale for their pictures. 

It was a privilege and a pleasure to have worked with them all in keeping 
the fetal heart beating. 



George Cytroen, 
Frederick W. Hehre, 



Chairmen, Editorial Committee 



Daniel S. Lukas, Chairman, Photography Committee 

Robert M. Donauer, Chairman, Business Committee 



81 



PATRON S 



Dr. Hattie E. Alexander 

Dr. J. Bums Ambereon 

Dr. Virginia Apgar 

Dr. Dana W. Atchley 

Dr. Robert P. Ball 

Dr. Louis Bauman 

Dr. Arthur H. Blakemore 

Dr. John H. Boyd 

Dr. Harold W. Brown 

Dr. Charles L. Buxton 

Dr. George F. Cahill 

Dr. A. Benson Cannon 

Dr. John Caffey 

Dr. Hans T. Clarke 

Miss Margaret E. Conrad 

Dr. Henry S. F. Cooper 

Dr, Wilfred M. Copenhaver 

Dr. James A. Corscaden 

Mr. James Cunningham 

Dr. George E. Daniels 

Dr. Robert C. Darling 

Dr. William Darrach 

Dr. D. Anthony D'Esopo 

Dr. Samuel R. Detwiler 

Dr. A. Raymond Dochez 

Dr. John H. Dunnington 

Dr. Earl T. Engle 

The Hon. Edward R. Finch 

Mr. Henry L. Finch 

Dr. Goodwin LeB. Foster 

Dr. Virginia K. Frantz 

Dr. Ross Golden 

Dr. Magnus I. Gregersen 

Dr. Alexander B. Gutman 

Dr. Cushman D. Haagensen 

Dr. John M. Hanford 

Dr. Harold D. Harvey 

Dr. Leland E. Hinsie 

Dr. Bruce Hogg 

Dr. Joseph G. Hopkins 

Dr. George H. Humphreys, II 

Mr. George Janesky 

Dr. Julia M. Jon<?8 



82 



Dr. John D. Kernan 

Dr. Yale Kneeland, Jr. 

Dr. Albert R. Lamb, Sr. 

Dr. Albert R. Lamb, Jr. 

Dr. Robert L. Levy 

Dr. Aolan D. C. Lewis 

Dr. Robert F. Loeb 

Dr. Donovan J. McCune 

Dr. Rustin Mcintosh 

Dr. Harrison L. McLaughlin 

Dr. Edgar M. Medlar 

Dr. Frank L. Meleney 

Dr. H. Houston Merritt 

Dr. Katherine K. Merritt 

Dr. Edgar G. Miller, Jr. 

Dr. J. Lowry Miller 

Dr. Clay Ray Murray 

Dr. Harry S. Mustard 

Dr. John L. Nickerson 

Dr. Walter W. Palmer 

Dr. William B. Parsons 

Dr. George Perera 

Dr. Willard C. Rappleye 

Dr. Dickinson W. Richards, Jr. 

Dr. Henry A. Riley 

Dr. Walter S. Root 

Dr. Harry M. Rose 

Dr. Fordyce B. St. John 

Dr. John E. Scarff 

Dr. Aura E. Severinghaus 

Dr. Lawrence W. Sloan 

Dr. Alan DeF. Smith 

Dr. Frederick M. Smith 

Dr. Harry P. Smith 

Dr. Philip E. Smith 

Dr. William H. Stearns 

Dr. Barbara B. Stimson 

Dr. Byron Stookey 

Dr. Arthur P. Stout 

Dr. William E. Studdiford, Jr. 

Dr. Howard C. Taylor, Jr. 

Dr. Harry B. Van Dyke 

Dr. Benjamin P. Watson 

Dr. Jerome P. Webster 

Dr. Rene Wegria 

Dr. Randolph West 



83 




Browsing in the Bookstore 





«k««&: | ;. ;<<<<<<<<<<^:<;< w&m<<<<<< 




Trimble in the wee hours 



And this, they didn't teach us 



To each his own 



Seen at the Christmas party 



Student Council 





Rueckert and Russo 



Martens makes an appointment 




Burtan on the ball 



m 




-- » 


1 
I 




1 




Jjjj 







Dr. Andersen presides over Pediatrics path conference 





Emma rings one up 



Mr. and Mrs. Cunningham 



j. 



Our gal Stella 



With the Compliments 



of 



BARD HALL 



87 



1 




IB 6 7-1947 



THE UNION CENTRAL LIFE 
INSURANCE CO., CINCINNATI 

* 
W. HOWARD COX, PRESIDENT 

ASSETS OVER $559,0 0,0 00 



88 




WITH THE COMPLIMENTS OF 




MAKERS OF STEROID HORMONES 
AND FINE PHARMACEUTICALS 



CIBA PHARMACEUTICAL PRODUCTS, INC 

SUMMIT, NEW JERSEY 



89 



BACKGROUND 

Three Decades of Clinical Experience 

THE use of cow's milk, water and carbohydrate mixtures 
represents the one system of infant feeding that consist- 
ently, for three decades, has received universal pediatric 
recognition. No carbohydrate employed in this system of 
infant feeding enjoys so rich and enduring a background 
of authoritative clinical experience as Dextri-Maltose. 

DEXTRI-MALTOSE No. 1 (with 2% sodium chloride), ior normal babies. 

DEXTRI-MALTOSE No. 2 (plain, salt free), permits salt modifications by the phy- 
sician. 

DEXTRI-MALTOSE No. 3 (with 3% potassium bicarbonate), for constipated babies. 

These products are hypo-allorganic 

DEXTRI-MALTOSE 

Please enclose professional card when requesting samples of Mead Johnson products to cooperate in preventing their 
reaching unauthorized persons. Mead Johnson & Company, Eransville, Ind., U. S, A. 



Compliments 
of 

REME FOOD, INC. 

4021 Broadway 
Corner 169th Street 



Tel. WA 3-9795 




DEDICATION 




A medical school graduation is more than 
a commencement to its new doctors. It is a 
dedication to a lifetime of service, to work- 
ing and studying for the betterment of the 
public health. 
The doctor continues to learn through internship, residency, 
practice and clinical studies. Dedicated to his assistance are 
organizations of great technical resources, whose goal is to 
provide for him the tools of his profession. 
In the field of endocrinology. Schering, a leader in research 
and manufacture of hormone preparations, is dedicated to the 
expansion of knowledge and to constant advance in the tech- 
niques of production and administration of endocrines. 



c^cketi 



CXlUCi CORPORATION -BLOOM FIELD-NEW JERSEY 

// IN CANADA. SCHERING CORPORATION LIMITED, MONTREAL 



efficient, 



low-dosage 



treatment of 
ulcerative 
colitis with 




ulfathalidine 



Phthalylsulfathiazole 



This nontoxic, low-dosage, enteric sulfonamide is excep- 
tionally effective against acute and chronic ulcerative colitis, and recently 
proved successful in the treatment of 76 out of 80 patients 1 with this disease. 
After therapy with the drug, stools become formed and odorless, blood in 
stools disappears, cramping in abdomen subsides within 48 hours, and 
evacuations are reduced substantially. 2 

'Sulfathalidine' phthalylsulfathiazole is indicated also 
in the treatment of regional ileitis, as a supplement to the therapy of amebiasis, 
giardiasis and paratyphoid infections, and as an adjunct to intestinal surgery. 

'Sulfathalidine' phthalylsulfathiazole maintains a high 
bacteriostatic concentration in the gastrointestinal tract (1250 mg. per cent). 
An average of only 5% of the drug is absorbed from the bowel and this is 
rapidly excreted by the kidneys. Administered in daily doses of onlv 0.05 Gm. 
to 0.1 Gm. per kilogram of body weight. Supplied in 0.5-Gm. compressed tab- 
lets in bottles of 100, 500 and 1,000. Sharp & Dohme, Philadelphia 1, Pa. 



1. I.A.M.A. 729:1080. Dei-. IS, 1915 

2. Illinois M. J. 88:85, August, 19 IS 




02 



m 



92 



WE HAVE YOUR OFflCE EQUIPMENT IN STOCK 

WE ARE ALWAYS READY TO HELP YOU 

For twenty years we have devoted ourselves to one prime idea. 

"SERVICE TO THE PHYSICIAN" 

Quality Merchandise at Reasonable Prices 

Items Varying from a Needle to an X-Ray Machine 

X-Rays — Fluoroscopes — Whirlpool Baths — Short Waves 

Metabolors — Electrocardiographs 

Office, Waiting Room and Examining Room Furniture — Supplies 



soma • J. 8EE8ER CO. 



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"THE LARGEST INSTITUTION Of ITS KIND IN THE EAST" 



638 BROADWAY. NEW YORK 3. N. Y. 
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Oculists' Prescriptions Filled 
Wholesale or Retail 

ly Work Done On Premises 

OPTICAL & MEDICAL SUPPLIES 

Distributors and Exporters 

CROWN OPTICAL 
COMPANY 

800 - 8th Avenue 

NEW YORK, N. Y. 

Between 48th & 49th Sts. 

Tel. CI 6-8767 



The 
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THE ALPS CANDY SHOPS. Inc. 

4001 Broadway 
Corner 168th Street 



Haircut or a Manicure 

V. LaPORTA & SON 

SIX EXPERTS 

4005 Broadway 
Near 168th Street 

WAdsworth 8-4910 



93 



THE BOOKSTORE 

EXTENDS ITS SINCEREST 
GOOD WISHES TO 
THE SENIOR CLASS 

MEDICAL CENTER BOOKSTORE 


Compliments of 

THE YALTA 
OPEN KITCHEN 

4019 Broadway at 169th Street 
NEW YORK CITY, N. Y. 

"Where the Finest Food is Served" 

OPEN EVERY DAY 


ATLANTIC 
BARBER SHOP 

AUGUST HOEHN 

4021 Broadway. Cor. 169th St. 
NEW YORK, N. Y. 


PAUL SEMEL 

JEWELER and OPTICIAN 
4009 Broadway at 168th Street 

WAshington Heights 7-3233 




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ALL GARMENTS INSURED 

For Prompt Call and Delivery Service 

Call WAshington Heights 7-3884 

D. APPEL 

EXPERT TAILOR AND FURRIER 
Cleaners and Dyers 

230 Ft. Washington Avenue 

Bet. 169th and 170 Streets 



94 



The Journal of Nervous and Mental Disease 

An Educational Journal of Neuropsychiatry 
$10.00 Per Year — Outside Continental U. S. — $11.00 

• 

The Psychoanalytic Review 

An Educational American Journal of Psychoanalysis 
$7.00 Per Year — Outside Continental U. S— $7.70 

• 

Nervous and Mental Disease Monographs 

NOLAN D. C. LEWIS, M.D., Managing Editor 
70 Pine Street, New York City 5, N. Y. 



All negatives of Senior Formal 
photographs appearing in this 
book are in our files. Additional 
finished portraits may be pur- 
chased at special school rates. 

APEDA STUDIO, INC. 

212 West 48th Street 
NEW YORK 19, N. Y. 

Circle 6-0790 



Phone: WAshington Heights 7-1753 

ELBERON 
HAND LAUNDRY 

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The Laundry ot Cheertul Service 

S. W. Cor. 169th Street 

4015 Broadway 
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CENTER PHARMACY 

THE REXALL STORE 

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Bet. 168th and 169th Sts. 

NEW YORK, N. Y. 

I. A. Harkavy — J. Kaplan 

WAdsworth 3-1258 




...TEAMWORK 



are as necessary in the building of a fine 
yearbook as they are in the construction of a skyscraper. Here at Campus we have 
gathered, over the years, an organization of skilled artists and idea men . . . experienced 
printing, engraving and production men . . . all welded into a team that is ready to work 
with you and fur you, to help build your yearbook into a better and liner publication. 

Campus complete service enables you to get from a single source everything needed 
to produce your book, all under a single budget control that insures you against unexpected 
"extras." This service includes every phase of the job from planning and layout to cover- 
making and final printing and binding. 

Campus has helped hundreds of staffs build annuals that will be memorable 
for a lifetime. Each year several Campus-produced annuals take top honors in National 
competition. 



The Largest Designers and Producers of 
Outstanding Yearbooks in the East 




CAMPUS PUBLISHING 

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PRINTING 



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COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY LIBRARIES 



0064278190 



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